Eye Color & Genetics

Eye Color & Genetics

Ever wonder why your eyes are blue, green, brown, or somewhere in between? The colored part of your eye, the Iris, contains pigmentation which determines our eye color. Your parents pass on chromosomes which combine to customize your eye color.

How eye color develops

Eye color is not as simple as other genetic traits. Three different genes contribute to your eye color. Due to dominant gene types, darker colors like brown overpower lighter colors like blue and green. Colors such as gray, hazel, and multiple combinations are not as common and are not yet completely understood.

Most babies are born with blue eyes, but did you know their eyes can darken for three years? Melanin is a pigment not present at birth, which develops with age and causes eyes to darken. The more melanin someone has, the darker their eyes will be.

Facts About Common Eye Colors:

  • Brown: Most common eye color worldwide. This varies between dark brown, light brown, and honey brown eyes.
  • Blue: People with blue eyes have less melanin in their eyes than any other color. Blue eyes are thought to come from a genetic mutation of one individual.
  • Green: Thought to be the most attractive and one of the rarest eye colors.
  • Hazel: The hue of hazel eyes changes based on what you are wearing and the type of lighting you are in. Hazel eyes host a variety of colors.

Changes in eye color

When your pupil changes size, the pigments in the iris of your eye compress or spread apart causing the color of your eyes to change. Your pupils change size for a variety of reasons including changes in light and the distance of the object you are focusing on. Emotions can also change the pupil size and iris color.

Heterochromia

Heterochromia is a condition in which a person’s eyes are different colors, caused by one eye having more melanin than the other. Typically, present at birth and is not considered an eye disease as it does not commonly cause vision problems.

Enhancing your eye color

  • Wear eyeglass frames to compliment your eye color and skin tone.

Example: Determine if you are “warm” or “cool” toned skin and eye color then match your frames with a complementary color.

  • Use eye makeup to bring out the color of your eyes.

Example: Pinks, purples, and silvers bring out the warmth in brown eyes.

  • Wear clothing which compliments or contrasts your eye color.

Example: Orange, red, and gold highlight the natural hue of blue eyes.

  • Choose hairstyles and colors to accentuate your eyes.

Example: Bangs and layers which frame the face draw more attention to your eyes.

  • Colored contact lenses give you the opportunity to try out a new look.

Common Eyelid Bumps

Common Eyelid Bumps

Eyes are one of the most sensitive areas of the body and we tend to notice any pain related to our eyes relatively quickly. Here are a few common eye conditions and symptoms causing eyelid bumps. Have more questions? Give our office a call!

I have a red bump near the edge of my eyelid, what is this?

An infection called a stye causes this red bump. Bacteria enter the base of an eyelash and become infected. It can be contagious so it is important to wash your hands if you touch your eyes and not share any washcloths or hand towels with others. While a stye can be annoying, you should never pop or poke it. Eventually, a stye will heal on its own within a few days. Use a warm washcloth can help to alleviate some of the pain and speed up the healing process.

What is the bump inside my eyelid?

An infection called chalazion causes the bump inside your eyelid. This is similar to stye but found inside the eyelid on an oil gland. Typically, this red swollen bump is benign and containings fatty secretions that normally help lubricate the eye. Chalazions are not infectious and typically resolve on their own within a few days to a week. Try using a warm compress to help relieve discomfort and move along the healing process. If you are experiencing pain or discomfort from a chalazion and it does not heal on its own, call our office to schedule an appointment!

Why does my baby have tiny bumps on and around the eye area?

Milia are the tiny white or yellowish bumps seen around a baby’s eyes. These look similar to a whitehead but are not acne. Milia occur in clusters and are caused by dead skin cells getting trapped under the surface of the skin. Most commonly, they occur in babies but can be found at any age. Parents can expect milia on newborns to resolve on its own within a few weeks. Do not try to pop or remove milia yourself.

Why is my eyelid swollen?

Inflammation or excess fluid surrounding the eye causes a swollen eyelid. Eye infections, injuries, trauma, and allergies are the most common causes of a swollen eyelid. Whether or not you experience pain and how long the healing process will take is determined by the cause of the swelling. Are you experiencing swelling surrounding your eye from an unknown cause or for an extended period of time? Call our office to schedule an appointment or consult with your eye doctor.  

Have more questions?

If your eyelid condition or concern does not fit into one of these categories or you have additional questions please call our office to schedule a consultation. The staff can answer all of your questions and give a personalized recommendation for your eye care.

Dr Joe Prell welcomes you

For more than 39 years, Dr. Joe Prell, Optometrist, has been providing a wide variety of professional and reliable services to the Reedsburg, WI area. We carry high-quality brands such as Marc by Marc Jacobs, DVF, Nike, Columbia, Tommy Hilfiger, Anne Klein, Banana Republic, WileyX, Sketchers, Vistakon, Ciba, and Bausch and Lomb. Come and visit us today!

Our services

  • Infections
  • Eye disease management
  • Foreign body removal
  • Glaucoma
  • Cataract co-manage
  • LASIK co-management
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